Meditation and Trauma: Untangling the Tangle of Contemplative Dissociation

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Meditation and Trauma: Untangling the Tangle of Contemplative Dissociation

  1. Marty says:

    I entered a zen center with a severe case of C-PTSD for about five years after sitting by myself for months. My goal was different than anyone else, I was not interested in enlightenment in a couple of decades of abstract meditation on koans or counting the breath.

    Many of the foundations of practice were invaluable, sitting for someone else always and no goals have stayed with me to this day.

    I had so much better an understanding of trauma than the residing monk, that he actually was a hindrance to my recovery at times. When you go to the little room for guidance, the resident monk becomes a therapist without credentials and in my case handled badly.

    Meditation, a daily practice with current, concrete, immediate attention, a laser like application of mindfulness will collapse trauma or PTSD, as it did for me and others I have helped.

    I was told that you are a novice until you have a decade under your belt, a judgment of the nth degree in a place supposedly absent of judgment. That statement is false totally.

    Great article though exploring dissociation, the kind of all symptoms and the place where trauma fuels and grows stronger

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s